Day 30.1: Da Ocean in Muxia


Day 30
Date: Wednesday, Oct 5, 2016
Start: Olveiroa
Stop: Bella Muxia Albergue, Muxia     👍👍
Distance (Day/Total): 32/722 km
High Temp: 18 C/64 F (Low:  11 C/52 F)

A single thumbs up or down is simply an indication of whether I would stay there again or not.  It is not a recommendation.  A double thumbs up or down indicates that the place was great and I highly recommend it or absolutely awful and stay away.

Up around 6:30 am.  Grab my pack and sleeping bag and I’m out of the dorm.  There are quite a few people also up and getting ready.  I get dressed.  Pack.  I pass by As Pias, the restaurant from dinner, last night.  It’s open and I decide to have breakfast.  Sit at the bar.  It’s empty when I get there but shortly after a local drops in.  I’m guessing a regular because a glass of some sort of liqueur (Orujo?) is poured and ready by the time he makes it to the bar.  I pass on the liqueur and go the more traditional route of toast, juice and coffee for breakfast.  I’m IMG_3237on my way by 7:15 am.  It’s dark, cold and still.  

Another beautiful sunrise.

It’s early but I do run across a few pilgrims.  At Hospital, there is a pilgrims information center but, this early, it’s closed.

Just past Hospital, I come to a fork in the trail – left for Finisterre and right for Muxia.  Most people go to Finisterre, ending their journey at the lighthouse there and returning to Santiago by bus.  A smaller subset will walk on to Muxia, returning to Santiago by bus from there.  And an even smaller group will go to Muxia first and then walk along the coast to Finisterre.  I head to Muxia.

A couple of lawnmowers, tied up.

After the turn to Muxia, I see hardly any pilgrims.  There are a lot of hills and you don’t see the ocean until you are nearly in Muxia.  In the old days, few people had seen the ocean and pilgrims who saw it for the first time were awestruck at the vastness of it.

IMG_3244IMG_3245

It was pretty spectacular sight.  The pictures don’t even come close to doing it justice.  There is a boardwalk that goes along the beach and then in a circuitous route, over a sand dune and around, makes it into a town.  But because it is low tide, I realize that I can actually cut across the beach and over some rocks for a more direct route into town and thats what I do.  On the way, I run into a very dapper older gentleman out for a stroll on the beach.  He has a WTF expression on his face as he watches me make my way across the rocks trying to avoid getting water into my boots.

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Boardwalk to Muxia, Spain

Muxia is a tiny, touristy fishing village.  Because it’s Fall, there aren’t many tourists.  Mostly pilgrims.  I pass by a couple of hotels.  When I get to the other end of town, I see a seafood restaurant with a sign that they have rooms to rent.  I decide to check out the rooms.  It’s around 3 pm – siesta time – and the restaurant is empty.  No diners.  No employees.  I stick around for a little bit, waiting for an employee.  When none appears, I move on.  I come across the Bella albergue.  It is huge and modern and I decide that that will be my stop for the night.  It is very nice and the guy manning the front desk is funny and very helpful.  I get my bed, shower and do laundry; they have a washer and a dryer.

While waiting on my laundry, Sue and Rebecca show up.  Rebecca has to cut her trip short for an family emergency.  I also talk to the German (I think) and Italian couple I met several days ago.  They were probably in their 60s, had met on a camino several years ago, walked together and gotten married.  They were very sweet.  I met a strange little French guy who was on some year long walk to various holy sites, trying to get his art project funded.  The project involved having people send him bottles of sand.  Didn’t fully understand or why he needed the money but it was like being trapped by a car salesman.  I finally make an excuse and am able to extricate myself.

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